No Time To Die (2021) Review: A Farewell Lullaby

Daniel Craig’s last outing as the iconic James Bond in No Time To Die promises viewers hardcore action and a unique touch of emotional liberation. Based on Ian Fleming’s James Bond literary franchise, all the Bond films to date have had one thing missing- a human touch to our flawless, striving protagonist Agent 007. With No Time To Die, the creators have not only made the character of Bond more earthly, but they have also tried their best to make sure no one ever forgets this Bond film, for all the right reasons.

Directed by the person behind the first season of True Detective Cary Joji Fukunaga, No Time To Die offers a storyline that gives perfect closure to all the loose ends since Casino Royale (2006). The cast flaunts brilliant actors like Rami Malek, Lea Seydoux, Ana De Armas, Lashana Lynch, Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, Christoph Waltz alongside Craig, some of whom are new and some who reprise in their previous roles in Spectre.

With a runtime of 2 hours 45 minutes, No Time To Die holds our hand tightly at the very start, squeezes it mildly as the time goes by, only to let it go by the end so we can start a new chapter in our lives.

– No Time To Die Review does not contain spoilers –

No Time To Die: The Past Is Back

The film opens with a flashback from Madeleine’s life, unlike any other Bond film which has always started with a sequence of Daniel Craig. That right there is the audience’s hint to understand how the character of Madeleine is going to ultimately shape the film’s outcome.

At the beginning of the film, we find Bond and Swann on a romantic getaway, far off from the eyes of the prying enemies. Yet Bond can’t stop looking over his shoulder, expecting the past to stab him in the back and it does. As the director tries to pull a Vesper through Madeleine’s character and make James aloof and broken again, we are pained to confront how all the women in James’ life have either died or betrayed him.

The film then cuts to five years ahead, to a time when: Bond has resigned, A new 007 has been reinstated, the CIA & MI6 are hunting the same man, differently and the smell of a new disaster swims all around. With the life of the entire planet at stake, James Bond takes the lead to eradicate the enemy, once again. But, what will happen when the love of his life returns with an enemy’s hand around her neck? Well, Bond is still the man for the job.

With another series of car chases, shooting and hand to hand combat that makes the film almost look like something out of a video game, James Bond is on the mission again to hunt the figure more dangerous than the previously existing “SPECTRE”. However, this run, which almost looks like his last, is filled with passion and sacrifice.

Also Read: Daniel Craig to Star in Macbeth With Ruth Negga, Here’s What We Know

No Time To Die: Goodbye, James

No Time To Die is a fitting goodbye to Daniel Craig’s James Bond franchise. With music from Hans Zimmer and title credits sung by Billie Eilish that is layered with easter eggs about the film and visuals so stunning that it will give you a psychedelic trip, No Time To Die is more about Daniel Craig than the character he plays. The last 40 minutes of the film are packed with action and suspense, ending it all with a missile of love.

In his last role as James Bond, Craig delivers his best and it is hard to imagine if anyone would ever be capable enough to fill those shoes. Lea Seydoux gives a new meaning to being a Bond Girl as she brings out the best in James. Even her costume design fit into the purity and honesty of her character: we see Madeleine dressed in white through most of the film indicating all those times when she is being righteous and honest, the only time she is clothed in black is when she visits Blofeld and is suspecting of doing something wrong.

The brief role by Ana De Armas was delightful and one can only wish to have had more of her in the film. Naomie Harris’ Moneypenny, Ralph Fiennes’ M, Lashana Lynch’s 007 and Ben Whishaw’s Q were incredible as the supporting cast. However, Rami Malek’s Safin was a little disappointing.

No Time To Die: Final Verdict

A tribute to Daniel Craig and a turn of events that has made the character of James Bond feel more relatable and humanly, No Time To Die is a film that truly deserved a theatrical release and, gladly it has gotten one. The music, cinematography and acting all synchronize beautifully to give Daniel Craig’s James Bond a farewell lullaby.

No Time To Die is out in theatres now! Find out more about the film, here.

Also Read: Planning to Watch No Time to Die? These James Bond Movies Are a Must See Before You Do!

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REVIEW OVERVIEW

Overall

SUMMARY

No Time To Die is Daniel Craig's emotional goodbye to James Bond, filled with action and love.

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