Big Mouth Season 5 Review: As Sexy and Relatable As Ever

Big Mouth is an adult-animated TV series created by Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Mark Levin, and Jennifer Flackett, and starring Nick Kroll, John Mulaney, Maya Rudolph, Jordan Peele and Jessi Klein, alongside other cast members. Big Mouth season 5 has 10 episodes, each around 30 minutes long.

Netflix describes the series as:

Teenage friends find their lives upended by the wonders and horrors of puberty in this edgy comedy from real-life pals Nick Kroll and Andrew Goldberg.

– Big Mouth season 5 review does not contain spoilers –

Oh, man. What do I say about Big Mouth? Am I qualified to talk about Big Mouth? Is anyone?! That’s all I could think about as I started to binge season 5. The first episode is called No Nut November, so you know. It features Kumail Nanjiani who breaks a walnut in between his butt. This messy series, about kids going through puberty, is uncomfortable, relatable and weirdly satisfying to watch. Every scene is funny and relatable.

One of the talking points of Big Mouth season 5 is Jay and Lola’s relationship. As we have come to understand, it’s pretty f-ed up. But that’s exactly what teenage love is, and as relevant and uncomfortable this series is, season 5 is nestled right there too, rather comfortably. It tackles relationships truthfully and with ease and something, with a lot of care and affection. At other times, Lola live tweets squishing her fingers in mud to get Jay horny.

Growing up can be hard (yep) and very intense and season 5 tackles the different aspects of it – although we have seen this throughout the last four seasons, this season, too, tackles different emotions as well the other… nutty stuff. The jealousy, shame and insecurity, too, come in in heaps but it’s how it is tackled that will get through to you. These aren’t bad kids necessarily, but the time’s not the best. It’s quite understandable.

Big Mouth season 5 is as funny as its predecessors, relatable, and very raw. I love this series because it tackles the worst parts of growing up in the most humorous way. But then again, it reminds me of a time not too long ago and I get the jitters. The body insecurity part is one of the most relatable things for me, personally. Of course, this will change with everyone. But regardless, it’s a good thing to know that hundreds of people across the world go through the same problems that we do. None of us is alone, you know?

Also Read: Netflix’s Catching Killers (2021) Review: Harrowing

The social commentary is always the one that gets me with this series and season 5 is no exception. The Shame Wizard’s antics lead a lot of points home but at the end of the day, it’s the kids themselves who must learn to love and accept themselves. It’s a constant battle though, but it gets better down the line.

As the kids grow up, their lives, too, change and they become even more sexual. Thus, season 5 is extremely, extremely, seeped in sex and masturbation. But the series does a good job at balancing it with the social commentary and it never made me cringe. It’s not inappropriate, just the reality. Kids are going to masturbate, have sex and occasionally be jealous, vindictive and insecure. And, that’s ok. As all the characters mature and change, so do their outlooks towards themselves, those around them and towards life as a whole.

Summing up: Big Mouth season 5

Big Mouth season 5 is as fun and relatable as its predecessors. It’s nice to know we’re not alone in our insecurities. But then again, it might make you a bit uncomfortable… and you will definitely want to hug these teenagers and stop them from overthinking.

Big Mouth season 5 is streaming on Netflix.

Also Read: Netflix’s We Couldn’t Become Adults Review: Genuine Love

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REVIEW OVERVIEW

Overall

SUMMARY

Big Mouth season 5 is just as quirky and funny as its predecessors and makes for a hilarious watch.

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