Netflix’s Blood and Water Season 2 Review: Identity Crisis and Drugs

Blood and Water Season 2 is now out on Netflix. The series stars Ama Qamata, Khosi Ngema, Thabang Molaba, Dillon Windvogel, Arno Greeff, Greteli Fincham, Cindy Mahlangu, and Xolile Tshabalala. The latest season has 7 episodes of 45-50 minutes.

The synopsis for Blood & Water Season 2 reads – As the search for answers intensifies, Puleng encourages Fiks to consider a complex truth while navigating a close-knit community of allies and enemies.

Blood and Water Season 2 Review Contains No Spoilers

The first season ended with Puleng (Ama Qamata) telling Fikile (Khosi Ngema) that they’re sisters. The revelation didn’t go down well with Fikile, who gets protection order against Puleng. Blood and Water Season 2 picks off where the first season ended. Fikile might show that she’s in denial, but deep down, she starts doubting her life, parents and attempts to seek the truth.

From the first episode till the second last episode, Fikile deals with an identity crisis comes across unexpected truth, and her love life also shows no progress. Puleng goes through a lot of drama too. Her equation with Wade doesn’t seem hopeful; she’s risking her relationship with KB to seek some big secrets while also handling her emotions towards Fikile.

The latest season has brought in the front various characters apart from just Puleng and Fikile. Fikile seeks therapy, but her therapist is also carrying some secrets. Someone is sneakily selling drugs in school, and the staff is tired of the hard time students are giving them.

Also Read: Netflix’s Ganglands: Review Drugs, Rivalries and Deaths

I’m glad the latest season has only 7 episodes because adding more would make it stagnant. While a few twists were good, the cliffhanger ending is a put-off. How much will they drag the story based on two teenage girls? Some might find the ending astonishing, but I wished the makers had given the series a conclusion.

Blood and Water Season 2 Review: Final Thoughts

Overall, the latest season is decent. There are some scenes representing the characters in traditional attire, which I liked. In terms of storytelling, it holds your attention sometimes and appears silly otherwise. The addition of drugs plot is overdone in almost every teenage TV series. The latest season answers some major queries but sets up a few questions that will be addressed next season.

Blood & Water Season 2 is now streaming on Netflix.

Also Read: The Morning Show Season 2 Episode 2 Review: Teases Big Drama

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REVIEW OVERVIEW

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SUMMARY

Blood and Water Season 2 Review: The tale of two 'maybe' sisters is back with some more twists this time.

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Blood and Water Season 2 Review: The tale of two 'maybe' sisters is back with some more twists this time. Netflix's Blood and Water Season 2 Review: Identity Crisis and Drugs